SA ALL BREED SALE_2018Happy Holidays from SLSCFC_banner_4-20-17
Advertise With Us Subscribe Today Facebook
SouthernLivestock.com
Not a member? Membership has its privileges— Register today! • Make SLS your homepage!
Cattle & Services Directory
CFC_box ad_4-20-17House Ad_Box_#2
TBC_box_5-14-17SA All Breed Sale_box 2018
Note: login or register to personalize
Submit Recipes to the Editor
home articles Pastures & Forages |

Remove Net Wrap and Twine

published: December 4th 2017
by: Bruce Anderson
source: Nebraska Extension

Is twine or net wrap good feed? Obviously not, but it can cause health problems if animals eat too much of it.

Feeding hay is work. To lighten the work load feeding hay, we often take short cuts and leave some twine or net wrap on the bales. Whether we want them to or not, animals eat some of that twine.

A few years ago I shared with you information I had received from Dr. Dee Griffin, veterinarian at the Great Plains Veterinary Education Center in Clay Center, about the potential for twine to accumulate in the rumen of cattle and cause obstruction. Recent research at North Dakota State University has confirmed this risk and provided further information on what happens to twine when cattle eat it.

In a series of experiments, the North Dakota research first showed that neither plastic net wrap nor biodegradable twine get digested by rumen microbes. Sisal twine, however, does get digested, although quite a bit more slowly than hay.

In another study net wrap was included in the ration fed to steers for an extended period of time. Then, 14 days before the steers were harvested the net wrap was removed from the feed to learn if the net wrap eaten earlier might get cleared out of the rumen and digestive system. Turns out it was still in the rumen even after 14 days. 

So what should you do? First, remember that it doesn’t appear to be a health concern very often. Cows are obviously more at risk than feedlot animals. So, it might be wise to remove as much twine, especially plastic twine, as can be removed easily from bales before feeding. Twine in ground hay may be less of a problem since more of it is likely to pass completely through the animal.

Think about how shortcuts and work-reducing actions you take this winter might affect your animals. Then act accordingly.

Site:   Home   Publications   Market Reports   Sale Reports   Sale Calendar   Cattle & Service Directory   Full Commodities Report   Services   About Us   Contact Us

Article Categories:   All   Industry News   Herd Health   Feed & Nutrition   Pastures & Forages   Reproduction   Marketing   Columnists   Production   Genetics & Performance   Weather Forecast   Breed News   Producer Feature Stories   Items of Interest   New Products   Recipes

User:   Login   Logout   Register/Profile   Submit Market Report   Submit Sale Report